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Health & Medicine

International DNA database drives genetics research

Genetics researchers around the globe have access to a comprehensive record of all sequenced DNA, thanks to an international effort to share massive amounts of information between databases in Japan, the United States, and Europe.

Keeping the medical data in Japan’s university hospitals safe in case of disaster

The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 caused significant damage to local hospitals in the disaster area, destroying medical information systems in the hospitals and losing patients’ important medical records. The losses prompted Japan's university hospitals to jointly construct a new backup system that keeps their medical backup data in remotely located areas.

Providing healthcare in an entirely new dimension

The Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences in India is a leader in the field of telemedicine, e-health and allied technologies. India's national research and education network has been integrated within the hospital environment to improve the adoption and application of digital technologies for health.

Mining a genetic goldmine

MinE is an international project to search for the genetic causes of ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), a deadly neurodegenerative disease. Thanks to an enormous computing facility and the best network connection, the MinE project can generate better results.

Forecasting emerging technologies

Swedish information scientists collaborate with global pharmaceutical company and data mining experts to forecast technologies related to intelligent pharmaceuticals.

Processing sensitive data for schizophrenia research

Swedish researchers are incorporating sensitive register data in their cross-border analyses of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors for schizophrenia. Thanks to Tryggve, a new Nordic initiative to advance the utilization of sensitive biomedical data.

Unravelling the mysteries of our immune system

Five to six years ago, researchers were able to sequence hundreds of immune-system molecules (like antibodies) in the human body. Today they can sequence tens of millions.

The genomics revolution in Africa is well underway

African scientists have begun to study genomic influences on disease across their continent, and the Pan African bioinformatics network H3ABioNet supports much of their research, using videoconferencing to bring researchers together across vast distances.

Solving endocrine disorders without borders

“Diseases don’t know boundaries or country codes, we have to build systems that allow researchers to collaborate internationally,” says Professor Richard Sinnott. With that goal in mind, he established the endocrine genomics virtual laboratory - endoVL, which allows researchers to draw on large enough cohorts to conduct studies with real statistical power.

“We share the virus and mosquitoes, let’s also share our data”

Participants at the 3rd TEIN/APAN Dengue Fever workshop on 24 January in Manila reaffirmed their commitment to join forces with research and education networks to combat Dengue Fever and other infectious diseases such as Zika. Plans include developing a digital platform to exchange data and working towards an outbreak prediction model.

Helping clinicians unlock the power of genetic data

A full set of one person’s DNA data requires a stack of 50 DVDs while a large study with 1,000 patients can be hundreds of terabytes of data. This makes it impractical to transfer genomic data using traditional methods, challenging to store it, and virtually impossible to use it without advanced research and education networks like CANARIE, sophisticated software tools, and high performance computing facilities.

From numbers and sequences to personalised cancer treatment

New technologies for deep sequencing of DNA and RNA are paving the way for unprecedented opportunities in genomic medicine. Norwegian medical scientists enlist the Abel supercomputer in Oslo to transform numbers and genome sequences into improved and more personalized cancer treatment.