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Food Security

Ecuador’s upgraded network fuels groundbreaking research on conservation and biodiversity

The Amazon is the largest and best-known center of biodiversity on the planet, but its forests are being lost at unsustainably high rates. Ongoing research in the Ecuadorian Amazon since the mid-1990s has resulted in concrete environmental benefits for the region and is now supported by a new connection between Ecuador and the United States.

Research data zones improve collaboration on crop genome data

The University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and SURF are collaborating on a campus network infrastructure optimized for sending research data. The aim is to create a blueprint for an architecture to help researchers collaborate on data-intensive research. The first use case is focusing on crop genome data.

Raising the yield potential of wheat to feed the world

"With the world's population estimated to reach 9.6 billion by 2050, making staple foods - wheat, grains and rice - higher yielding, more resilient to climate variability and more nutritious is vital. We can’t delay. Collaboration on a global scale is needed to produce the bulk of the food in the world, or there’ll be problems," said researcher Professor Barry Pogson.

Creating an atlas of the black-eyed bean genome

“Without Science DMZ, our laboratories would be isolated islands,” says Ana Benko-Iseppon, a Brazilian researcher working on the global project to develop more environmentally adapted cultivated forms of the black-eyed bean.

Decoding the diversity of rice to improve yields

To meet world population demands for food it has been estimated that the production of rice, the world’s most important staple food, must increase by 24% by 2050. As well as the challenges involved in growing more rice on less land and water, farmers need new rice varieties adapted to changing climatic conditions.

Accelerating genomics research discovery to feed the world and fight disease

Faster access to genomics data aids researchers collaborating to find better ways to diagnose, treat and prevent cancer, as well those working to develop new plant varieties resistant to pests, floods and drought.

Advancing medical research… and the quality of your coffee

Thanks to the Mylims platform, scientists around the world are able to process and manipulate data, interpret results and compare them with spectra obtained by other users and those stored in databases, thus accelerating the understanding of compounds. Mylims has already led to breakthroughs in the diagnosis of illnesses, such as leukaemia, and has become a valuable tool for food chemists to detect fraudulent coffee.