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Health & Medicine

Life sciences researchers fast-track medical breakthroughs

Researchers collaborated across continents to advance our understanding of diabetic kidney disease and metabolic changes in pregnancy. High-speed networking plays a critical role connecting researchers and data in Australia to data, resources and colleagues located in Europe. 

Using simulations of acute care to aid stroke patients

The sooner a person suffering a stroke receives medical attention, the better the outcome is likely to be. Scenario training using simulation technology is helping hospital staff respond to these types of emergencies more efficiently.

Brazil breaks new ground with advanced telemedicine network

The Telemedicine University Network Rute in Brazil is considered the biggest initiative in telemedicine and telehealth in the world. Watch the interview with Rute’s coordinator, Luiz Ary Messina, and learn more about the reach and roadmap for this world-changing initiative.

Telemedicine: helping reduce deaths from cancer in Asia

Gastric cancer is the deadliest form of cancer in Asia. It accounts for the deaths of some 28 men and 13 women per 100,000. The Telemedicine Development Center of Asia has been building capacity to deliver valuable technical training for cancer specialists right across the region.

One event delivers remote surgical training to 1000+ Mexican physicians

By using high-definition videoconferencing technology and advanced academic networks, more than 1,000 Mexican physicians were trained remotely in the latest endoscopy procedures during a single event in 2015.

Making big data deliver

Researchers at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne wanted to know why there were an increasing number of patients – about a third of them women – being diagnosed with certain types of lung cancer when none of them had smoked and their families had no history of cancer. They turned to big data analytics.

Leveraging cloud services for better patient care

ARES (Advanced networking for the EU genomic Research) is implementing novel genome content distribution solutions to make large data sets accessible to healthcare practitioners for better patient care. Robust and bottleneck-free data networks are key to the success of this vital undertaking.

Driving the bioinformatics revolution in life sciences

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) near Cambridge, UK, distributes datasets worldwide using R&E connectivity. This biological data enables the discovery of new drugs, new diagnostics and increasingly new agro-chemicals. The Institute's work, which includes the 1000 Genomes Project, has generated petabytes of data and this growth is showing no signs of abating.

Improving how complex diseases are treated

Genomics is generating new insights into the genetic causes of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and congenital disorders, and promises to transform healthcare. In Australia, a specialized high-performance network has been deployed for the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics, the largest genome sequencing centre in the southern hemisphere, helping to close the gap between research and the clinic.

Dedicated line between supercomputers saves time for biomedical researchers

A dedicated line between two supercomputers in Denmark allows biomedical researchers to share data faster and easier than before, helping them carry out their research into the relationship between genetics and psychiatric illnesses.

Making strides towards on-demand genetics data

Today’s scientists are riding an unprecedented wave of discovery, but the immensity of the data needed to facilitate many of these breakthroughs is creating internet roadblocks that are becoming increasingly detrimental to research. With an eye to the future, Clemson University researchers are playing a leading role in developing state-of-the-art methods to transfer these enormous data sets.

Through methods of analysing fungi to victory in the orbit of Mars

Slovenian researchers analysed various aspects of the biology of extremophilic fungi, which can act as pathogens that are harmful to humans and used the same methods in their winning solution in data mining for the European Space Agency.