Menu
close

Asia Pacific

Life sciences researchers fast-track medical breakthroughs

Researchers collaborated across continents to advance our understanding of diabetic kidney disease and metabolic changes in pregnancy. High-speed networking plays a critical role connecting researchers and data in Australia to data, resources and colleagues located in Europe. 

E-portfolios help Japanese engineering students improve learning

The Engineering Department of the Kyushu Sangyo University in Japan has designed a dedicated e-portfolio as an educational tool to make students aware of their strengths and weaknesses, helping them achieve their goals in a structured fashion.

Telemedicine: helping reduce deaths from cancer in Asia

Gastric cancer is the deadliest form of cancer in Asia. It accounts for the deaths of some 28 men and 13 women per 100,000. The Telemedicine Development Center of Asia has been building capacity to deliver valuable technical training for cancer specialists right across the region.

Hook up to NOAH to know your hazards

While you can’t do anything to change the course of a typhoon moving towards you, you can take the necessary precautions before it reaches your shores - the earlier the better. So, you need to know your hazards, and that is why, in the wake of the catastrophic tropical storm Sendong in 2011, the Philippines started developing a complex early warning system.

Making big data deliver

Researchers at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne wanted to know why there were an increasing number of patients – about a third of them women – being diagnosed with certain types of lung cancer when none of them had smoked and their families had no history of cancer. They turned to big data analytics.

Improving how complex diseases are treated

Genomics is generating new insights into the genetic causes of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and congenital disorders, and promises to transform healthcare. In Australia, a specialized high-performance network has been deployed for the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics, the largest genome sequencing centre in the southern hemisphere, helping to close the gap between research and the clinic.

DUMBO to the rescue – deploying ICT for emergency medical care in post earthquake Nepal

On the 12th of April 2015, a devastating earthquake hit Nepal demolishing half a million buildings, killing 8.800 and injuring over 16.000 people. The research and education network of Nepal participated in the relief work by setting up emergency wireless networks at a number of hospitals treating earthquake victims.

International DNA database drives genetics research

Genetics researchers around the globe have access to a comprehensive record of all sequenced DNA, thanks to an international effort to share massive amounts of information between databases in Japan, the United States, and Europe.

Raising the yield potential of wheat to feed the world

"With the world's population estimated to reach 9.6 billion by 2050, making staple foods - wheat, grains and rice - higher yielding, more resilient to climate variability and more nutritious is vital. We can’t delay. Collaboration on a global scale is needed to produce the bulk of the food in the world, or there’ll be problems," said researcher Professor Barry Pogson.

Sharing knowledge to strengthen emerging networks

Helina Emeru is chief technology officer of Ethiopian research and education network EthERnet. In October 2016, she joined 9 colleagues from around the world at the NORDUnet conference as part of a new Knowledge Exchange Fellowship program.

Working towards a greener China with Wuhan University

REANNZ, Unitec, NIWA and Wuhan University are working collaboratively to address the concerning issue of air pollution, via an innovative three-year project that incorporates high-end environmental science, and cutting-edge Internet technology.

Keeping the medical data in Japan’s university hospitals safe in case of disaster

The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 caused significant damage to local hospitals in the disaster area, destroying medical information systems in the hospitals and losing patients’ important medical records. The losses prompted Japan's university hospitals to jointly construct a new backup system that keeps their medical backup data in remotely located areas.