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Astronomy

Creating a model of the Sun as a whole

In the WHOLE SUN project, world leading European solar and stellar physicists join expertise and techniques to create for the first time a global integrated view of our star and extend it to its twins.

Hunting for gravitational waves, a national and global collaboration

Australian scientists on the hunt for gravitational waves rely on AARNet for transferring data from LIGO detectors in the USA to OzGrav nodes in Australia for analysis.

Following the stars 24×7

SONG, the Stellar Observations Network Group is creating a network of small, interconnected, robotic telescopes scattered across the globe, to be able to focus on one specific point in the sky for days, weeks and months on end.

International researchers can now map the universe with Murchison

To ensure seamless and secure global research collaborations the MWA telescope has connected to eduGAIN.

Network connects astronomical observatories of the Canary Islands to the world

Data transmission between the astronomical observatories of the Canary Islands and the world increased tenfold since improving its connection to RedIRIS in 2012

Australian eResearch infrastructure lets astronomers hear echoes from the dawn of time

In a breakthrough discovery hailed as the most significant find in astronomy since gravitational waves, astronomers in the United States have used an Australian radio telescope to detect signal from the universe’s first stars.

LAGO Observatory: global collaboration, cosmic results

The LAGO (Latin American Giant Observatory) project traverses the skies of Latin America to set its sights on uncovering the mysteries of faraway galaxies.

Chasing gravitational waves with the network

The observation in August 2017, for the first time ever, of the merging of two neutron stars was the result of an important collaboration between the American and Italian interferometers LIGO and VIRGO. This discovery initiates the era of "multimessenger astrophysics," which promises to reveal exciting new insights about the Cosmos.

Networking of galactic proportions to uncover the mysteries of the universe

The skies of Latin America have captivated stargazers for centuries. Today, the landscape is dotted with many of the world’s most advanced and important regional, national and international observatories, providing forefront access to the heavens and beyond – enabling groundbreaking research to advance our knowledge of the universe.

Ecuador’s upgraded network fuels groundbreaking research on conservation and biodiversity

The Amazon is the largest and best-known center of biodiversity on the planet, but its forests are being lost at unsustainably high rates. Ongoing research in the Ecuadorian Amazon since the mid-1990s has resulted in concrete environmental benefits for the region and is now supported by a new connection between Ecuador and the United States.

Protecting the Earth from hazardous asteroids

On 19 April 2017 the 'Rock' asteroid made an uncomfortably close pass to Earth - the closest in 400 years. The first step to protecting against such hazards is to monitor them to calculate their precise orbits; this requires fast, reliable internet connections so that the huge volumes of observation data involved can be sent speedily and reliably to researchers around the world for analysis.

Chilean scientists watch explosion of 61 supernovas in real-time

Studies by scientists in Chile shed light on phenomenon related to the creation of the Universe, the formation of celestial bodies and the characterization of different kinds of stars. "Our goal is to understand the parent stars of supernovas. I mean, what kind of star produced the explosion", says researcher Francisco Förster.