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Astronomy

Through methods of analysing fungi to victory in the orbit of Mars

Slovenian researchers analysed various aspects of the biology of extremophilic fungi, which can act as pathogens that are harmful to humans and used the same methods in their winning solution in data mining for the European Space Agency.

Cleverly sharing workload across time zones

The control room is the first installation of its kind in America that can operate telescopes and fluorescence detectors at a distance, from Mexico to Argentina. It also maximizes usages times and optimizes the transmission of scientific data.

Saving the stars for the future

In 2009, NASA launched the Kepler space observatory to discover Earth-size planets orbiting other stars. For four and a half years, Kepler photographed a small 10-by-10 degrees section of the sky, taking snapshots each minute. "This is a goldmine of data, and we won’t see anything quite like it in the foreseeable future," explains Rasmus Handberg from the Stellar Astrophysics Centre at Aarhus University, Denmark.

Taking astronomy to the cloud

Astronomy has come a long way from the days of Galileo Galilei looking through a telescope to the skies. Major science infrastructures such as the Hubble Space Telescope and telescope arrays, including the forthcoming Square Kilometer Array, create huge amounts of research data for scientists across the world to explore and explain the cosmos.

EISCAT 3D radar– studying the interaction between Sun and Earth

The Nordic research and education networks are preparing to put a whole new network infrastructure in place for EISCAT 3D, as the powerful new radar is situated in remote northern Scandinavia to assure a minimum of background noise. For the next 35 to 40 years to come, it will be the centerpiece of the international network of instruments monitoring the Earth’s upper atmosphere and space environment.

How this astronomer looks back in time

Steven Tingay is passionate about designing and building radio telescopes in outback Western Australia and using them to look at the first stars and galaxies.

The world’s most accurate space weather simulator

As computer simulations go, Vlasiator is as huge as they come. Developing Vlasiator, Minna Palmroth, professor at the Finnish Meteorological Institute, has succeeded in doing what many of her colleagues thought impossible: Simulating weather in near-Earth space, showing how solar wind affects us, using high performance computing and high speed networks to do so.

LIGO scientists detect gravitational waves, confirming Einstein’s Theory

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory recently completed work that detected gravitational waves, confirming a major prediction of Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity. The discovery is an example of the power of collaboration supported by communications infrastructure purpose-built for global scientific research.

Brazilian scientists to partake in International Astronomy project

A group of 50 Brazilian researchers shall partake in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project, deemed as revolutionary for Astronomy. Totaling R$ 1 billion in investments, the Telescope will be able to map almost half of the sky in six filters for a period of ten years and its deluge of data will be a huge challenge for information technology.

From Sweden to scientists around the world

"Space and earth science are drivers of technical development, and with better instruments and more computing power we hope to realise many more ideas in the future," says Eskil Varenius from the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at Chalmers University of Technology.

Designing a computer system for the SKA

The Square Kilometre Array, or SKA, is the biggest science project New Zealand has ever been involved in, and it will produce more data than the world has ever seen.

Finding valuable data in a massive amount of noise

Japanese researchers – together with colleagues from around the world – are analysing data from the Joint ALMA Observatory, located in a remote part of Chile on the Atacama plateau, 5000 meters above sea level. High-speed research networks enable researchers to carry out their studies wherever they are situated, without needing to be at the observatory.