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Looking inside the Earth

The Earth is a complex and dynamic system, and the inner workings of our planet have serious catastrophic potential for humans in the form of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Using e-infrastructure resources and supercomputers, a research group at the University of Oslo, Norway, is investigating the link between processes which occur deep in Earth’s interior, and those at the surface.

“We share the virus and mosquitoes, let’s also share our data”

Participants at the 3rd TEIN/APAN Dengue Fever workshop on 24 January in Manila reaffirmed their commitment to join forces with research and education networks to combat Dengue Fever and other infectious diseases such as Zika. Plans include developing a digital platform to exchange data and working towards an outbreak prediction model.

Dancing beyond time: an encounter between tech and telematic art

Think of a dance performance in which the dancers, instead of sharing the same stage, are in different cities or even other continents. That is the mission of telematics dance, approaching dancers who are not necessarily in the same physical space, and creating other experience relations with the body and technological resources.

Solving problems in hi-tech environments before they occur

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to solve problems before they occur? Unfortunately, predicting the future is difficult when it comes to complex systems like industrial production lines or wind farms. But a group of European researchers and industry experts have joined forces to build a system of sensors and computers that could help us solve problems in high tech environments.

From numbers and sequences to personalised cancer treatment

New technologies for deep sequencing of DNA and RNA are paving the way for unprecedented opportunities in genomic medicine. Norwegian medical scientists enlist the Abel supercomputer in Oslo to transform numbers and genome sequences into improved and more personalized cancer treatment.

Helping to improve public service in France

In a unique collaboration, French research and education network RENATER will provide infrastructure connecting public administration sites from 15 ministries.

Making the Internet a bit safer

Research and education networks are not only about fibres, routers and switches. They also try to contribute to the common good of internet users. Enter CrypTech, making the Internet a little bit safer for everybody.

A humanist take on scientific computing

Finnish post-doctoral researcher Tuomo Hiippala is part of a new generation of humanist researchers, using powerful computational resources to boost their research. Combining a PhD in English Philology with a keen interest in computer vision and machine learning Hiippala is developing new ways of handling large collections of images.

Enabling discovery for the world’s largest scientific experiments

Latin America plays a vital role in the worldwide computing grid essential for processing the massive amounts of data generated from particle smashing experiments at the Large Hadron Collider that reveal information about the origins of the Universe.

Renewable energy for meteorology supercomputer

Three research networks are working together to provide the lifeline of a new meteorology supercomputer running on renewable energy. Through a 10 Gbps redundant fiberoptic cable running 2250 km across the North Atlantic, the Danish Meteorology Institute in Copenhagen connects to its new supercomputer located on Iceland.

From Sweden to scientists around the world

"Space and earth science are drivers of technical development, and with better instruments and more computing power we hope to realise many more ideas in the future," says Eskil Varenius from the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at Chalmers University of Technology.

What happens inside our heads listening to music?

Academy Professor Petri Toiviainen's research team at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, has set out to understand what happens in the brain when listening to music. Their experiments utilize Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a supercomputer cluster provided by the Finnish research and education network CSC.