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Genomics

Improving how complex diseases are treated

Genomics is generating new insights into the genetic causes of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and congenital disorders, and promises to transform healthcare. In Australia, a specialized high-performance network has been deployed for the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics, the largest genome sequencing centre in the southern hemisphere, helping to close the gap between research and the clinic.

Dedicated line between supercomputers saves time for biomedical researchers

A dedicated line between two supercomputers in Denmark allows biomedical researchers to share data faster and easier than before, helping them carry out their research into the relationship between genetics and psychiatric illnesses.

Making strides towards on-demand genetics data

Today’s scientists are riding an unprecedented wave of discovery, but the immensity of the data needed to facilitate many of these breakthroughs is creating internet roadblocks that are becoming increasingly detrimental to research. With an eye to the future, Clemson University researchers are playing a leading role in developing state-of-the-art methods to transfer these enormous data sets.

International DNA database drives genetics research

Genetics researchers around the globe have access to a comprehensive record of all sequenced DNA, thanks to an international effort to share massive amounts of information between databases in Japan, the United States, and Europe.

Raising the yield potential of wheat to feed the world

"With the world's population estimated to reach 9.6 billion by 2050, making staple foods - wheat, grains and rice - higher yielding, more resilient to climate variability and more nutritious is vital. We can’t delay. Collaboration on a global scale is needed to produce the bulk of the food in the world, or there’ll be problems," said researcher Professor Barry Pogson.

Creating an atlas of the black-eyed bean genome

“Without Science DMZ, our laboratories would be isolated islands,” says Ana Benko-Iseppon, a Brazilian researcher working on the global project to develop more environmentally adapted cultivated forms of the black-eyed bean.

Mining a genetic goldmine

MinE is an international project to search for the genetic causes of ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), a deadly neurodegenerative disease. Thanks to an enormous computing facility and the best network connection, the MinE project can generate better results.

Helping Australian Museum scientists save endangered koalas

Access to cloud services, such as high-performance computing and storage, that are impractical for the museum to house on site is significantly improving the analysis process and the way data is shared between Koala Genome Project partners, opening the door to new insights for conservation and protection.

Processing sensitive data for schizophrenia research

Swedish researchers are incorporating sensitive register data in their cross-border analyses of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors for schizophrenia. Thanks to Tryggve, a new Nordic initiative to advance the utilization of sensitive biomedical data.

Unravelling the mysteries of our immune system

Five to six years ago, researchers were able to sequence hundreds of immune-system molecules (like antibodies) in the human body. Today they can sequence tens of millions.

The genomics revolution in Africa is well underway

African scientists have begun to study genomic influences on disease across their continent, and the Pan African bioinformatics network H3ABioNet supports much of their research, using videoconferencing to bring researchers together across vast distances.

Solving endocrine disorders without borders

“Diseases don’t know boundaries or country codes, we have to build systems that allow researchers to collaborate internationally,” says Professor Richard Sinnott. With that goal in mind, he established the endocrine genomics virtual laboratory - endoVL, which allows researchers to draw on large enough cohorts to conduct studies with real statistical power.